2022–23 Pro-Core Social Studies Blueprints

No changes were made from 2021–22.

Pro-Core Grade 2 Social Studies Blueprint (30 Total Points – 6 Anchors)

Strand

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Strand

History

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. Multiple tier timelines can be used to show relationships among events and places.

1

3 – 4*

7
23%

Early Civilizations

2. Early civilizations (India, Egypt, China and Mesopotamia) had unique governments, economic systems, social structures, religions, technologies and agricultural practices and products. The cultural practices and products of these early civilizations can be used to help understand the Eastern Hemisphere today.

2

3 – 4*

Geography

Spatial Thinking and Skills

3. Geographic tools can be used to gather, process and report information about people, places and environments. Cartographers decide which information to include and how it is displayed.

3

1 – 2*

8
27%

4. Latitude and longitude can be used to identify absolute location.

4

1 – 2*

Places and Regions

5. Regions can be determined, classified and compared using data related to various criteria including landform, climate, population, and cultural and economic characteristics

5

1 – 2*

Human Systems

6. The variety of physical environments within the Eastern Hemisphere influences human activities. Likewise, human activities modify the physical environment.

6

1 – 2*

7. Political, environmental, social and economic factors cause people, products and ideas to move from place to place in the Eastern Hemisphere in the past and today.

7

1 – 2*

8. Diffusion of agricultural practices and products, technology, cultural practices and major world religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism) impacted the Eastern Hemisphere.

8

1 – 2*

Government

Civic Participation and Skills

9. Different perspectives on a topic can be obtained from a variety of historic and contemporary sources and used to effectively communicate and defend a claim based on evidence. Sources should be examined for accuracy and credibility.

9

3 – 4*

7
23%

Roles and Systems of Government

10. Governments can be categorized as monarchies, theocracies, dictatorships or democracies, but categories may overlap and labels may not accurately represent how governments function. The extent of citizens’ liberties and responsibilities varies according to limits on governmental authority.

10

3 – 4*

Economics

Economic Decision Making and Skills

11. Economists compare data sets to draw conclusions about relationships among them.

11

1 – 2*

8
27%

12. The choices made by individuals and governments have both present and future consequences. The evaluation of choices is relative and may differ across individuals and societies.

12

1 – 2*

Scarcity

13. The fundamental questions of economics include what to produce, how to produce and for whom to produce.

13

1 – 2*

14. When regions and/or countries specialize, global trade occurs.

14

1 – 2*

Markets

15. The interaction of supply and demand, influenced by competition, helps to determine price in a market. This interaction also determines the quantities of outputs produced and the quantities of productive resources (entrepreneurship, human resources, natural resources and capital) used.

15

1 – 2*

Financial Literacy

16. When selecting items to buy, individuals can weigh costs and benefits and compare the price and quality of available goods and services.

16

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 5 – 10 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
2 10 – 20 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
3 5 – 10 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 3 – 6 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 5 – 8 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 5 – 8 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 12 – 18 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 3 – 6 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 12 – 18 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
Pro-Core Grade 3 Social Studies Blueprint (34 Total Points – 7 Anchors)

Strand

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Strand

History

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. Events in local history can be shown on timelines organized by years, decades and centuries.

1

2 – 3*

7
20.6%

2. Primary and secondary sources can be used to show change over time.

2

2 – 3*

Heritage

3. Local communities change over time.

3

2 – 3*

Geography

Spatial Thinking and Skills

4. Physical and political maps have distinctive characteristics and purposes. Places can be located on a map by using the title, key, alphanumeric grid and cardinal directions.

4

1 – 2*

8
23.5%

Places and Regions

5. Daily life is influenced by the agriculture, industry and natural resources in different communities.

5

1 – 2*

Human Systems

6. Evidence of positive and negative human modification of the environment can be observed in the local community.

6

1 – 2*

7. Systems of transportation and communication move people, products and ideas from place to place.

7

1 – 2*

8. Communities may include diverse cultural groups.

8

1 – 2*

Government

Civic Participation and Skills

9. Members of local communities have rights and responsibilities.

9

1 – 2*

8
23.5%

10. Individuals make the community a better place by taking action to solve problems in a way that promotes the common good.

10

1 – 2*

Rules and Laws

11. Laws are rules which apply to all people in a community and describe ways people are expected to behave. Laws promote order and security, provide public services and protect the rights of individuals in the local community.

11

1 – 2*

Roles and Systems of Government

12. Governments have authority to make and enforce laws.

12

1 – 2*

13. The structure of local governments may differ from one community to another.

13

1 – 2*

Economics

Economic Decision Making and Skills

14. Line graphs are used to show changes in data over time

14

1 – 2*

11
32.4%

15. Both positive and negative incentives affect individual’s choices and behaviors.

15

1 – 2*

Scarcity

16. Individuals must make decisions because of the scarcity of resources. Making a decision involves a trade-off.

16

1 – 2*

Production and Consumption

17. A consumer is a person whose wants are satisfied by using goods and services. A producer makes goods and/or provides services.

17

1 – 2*

Markets

18. A market is where buyers and sellers exchange goods and services.

18

1 – 2*

Financial Literacy

19. Making decisions involves weighing costs and benefits.

19

1 – 2*

20. A budget is a plan to help people make personal economic decisions for the present and future and to become more financially responsible.

20

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 5 – 11 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
2 11 – 23 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
3 5 – 11 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 3 – 7 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 5 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 5 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 14 – 20 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 3 – 7 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 14 – 20 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
Pro-Core Grade 4 Social Studies Blueprint (35 Total Points – 7 Anchors)

Strand

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Strand

History

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. The order of significant events in Ohio and the United States can be shown on a timeline.

1

1 – 2*

12
34.3%

(31–35% on State Blueprint)

2. Primary and secondary sources can be used to create historical narratives.

2

1 – 2*

Heritage

3. Various groups of people have lived in Ohio over time including American Indians, migrating settlers and immigrants. Interactions among these groups have resulted in cooperation, conflict and compromise.

3

1 – 2*

4. The 13 colonies came together around a common cause of liberty and justice, uniting to fight for independence during the American Revolution and to form a new nation.

4

1 – 2*

5. The Northwest incorporated democratic ideals into the territories. It provided an process for territories to become states and recognize them as equal to the other existing states.

5

1 – 2*

6. Ongoing conflicts on the Ohio frontier with American Indians and Great Britain contributed to o the United States’ involvement in the War of 1812.

6

1 – 2*

7. Following the War of 1812, Ohio continued to play a key role in national conflicts including the anti-slavery movement and the Underground Railroad.

7

1 – 2*

8. Many technological innovations that originated in Ohio benefited the United States.

8

1 – 2*

Geography

Spatial Thinking and Skills

9. A map scale and cardinal and intermediate directions can be used to describe the relative location of physical and human characteristics of Ohio and the United States.

9

1 – 2*

8
22.8%
34.3% with Economics

(32–37% on State Blueprint with Economics)

Places and Regions

10. The economic development of the United States continues to influence and be influenced by agriculture, industry and natural resources in Ohio.

10

1 – 2*

11. The regions of the United States known as the North, South and West developed in the early 1800s largely based on their physical environments and economies.

11

1 – 2*

Human Systems

12. People have modified the environment throughout history resulting in both positive and negative consequences in Ohio and the United States.

12

1 – 2*

13. The population of the United States has changed over time, becoming more diverse (e.g., racial, ethnic, linguistic, religious). Ohio’s population has become increasingly reflective of the cultural diversity of the United States.

13

1 – 2*

14. Ohio’s location and its transportation systems continue to influence the movement of people, products and ideas in the United States.

14

1 – 2*

Government

Civic Participation and Skills

15. Individuals have a variety of opportunities to act in and influence their state and national government. Citizens have both rights and responsibilities in Ohio and the United States.

15

2 – 3*

11
31.4%

(31–35% on State Blueprint)

16. Effective participants in a democratic society requires individuals to make informed and reasoned decisions by accessing, evaluating and using information effectively to engage in compromise.

16

2 – 3*

Rules and Laws

17. Laws can protect rights, provide benefits and assign responsibilities.

17

2 – 3*

18. The U.S. Constitution establishes a system of limited government and protects citizens’ rights; five of these rights are addressed in the First Amendment.

18

1 – 3*

19. A constitution is a written plan for government. The Ohio Constitution and the U.S. Constitution separate the major responsibilities of government among three branches.

19

2 – 3*

Economics

Economic Decision Making and Skills

20. Tables and organize information in a variety of formats to help individuals understand information and issues.

20

1 – 2*

4
11.4%
34.3% with Geography

(32–37% on State Blueprint with Geography)

Production and Consumption

21. Entrepreneurs organize productive resources and take risks to make a profit and compete with other producers.

21

1 – 2*

Financial Literacy

22. Saving a portion of income contributes to an individual‘s financial well-being. Individuals can reduce spending to save more of their income.

22

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 6 – 12 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
2 12 – 23 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
3 6 – 12 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 4 – 7 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 5 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 5 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 14 – 21 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 4 – 7 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 14 – 21 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
Pro-Core Grade 5 Social Studies Blueprint (30 Total Points – 6 Anchors)

Strand

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Strand

History

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. Events can be arranged in order of occurrence using the conventions of B.C. and A.D. or B.C.E. and C.E.

1

1 – 2*

5
16.7%

Early Civilizations

2. Early Indian civilizations (Maya, Inca, Aztec, Mississippian) existed in the Western Hemisphere prior to the arrival of Europeans. These civilizations had developed unique governments, social structures, religions, technologies, and agricultural practices and products.

2

1 – 2*

Heritage

3. European exploration and colonization during the 1400s – 1600s had lasting effects which can be used to understand the Western Hemisphere today.

3

1 – 2*

Geography

Spatial Thinking and Skills

4. Geographic tools can be used to gather, process and report information about people, places and environments. Cartographers decide which information to include in maps.

4

1 – 2*

11
33.3%

5. Latitude and longitude can be used to make observations about location and generalizations about climate.

5

1 – 2*

Places and Regions

6. Regions can be determined using various criteria (e.g., landform, climate, population, cultural or economic).

6

1 – 2*

Human Systems

7. The variety among physical environments within the Western Hemisphere influence human activities. Human activities also alter the physical environment.

7

1 – 2*

8. American Indians developed unique cultures with many different ways of life. American Indian tribes and nations can be classified into cultural groups based on geographic and cultural similarities.

8

1 – 2*

9. Political, environmental, social and economic factors cause people, products and ideas to move from place to place in the Western Hemisphere and results in diversity.

9

1 – 2*

10. The Western Hemisphere is culturally diverse (e.g., language, food, religion, art, music) due to the influences and interactions of a variety of world cultures.

10

1 – 2*

Government

Civic Participation and Skills

11. Individuals can better understand public issues by gathering, interpreting, and checking information for accuracy from multiple sources. Data can be displayed graphically to effectively and efficiently communicate information.

11

1 – 3*

4
16.7%

Roles and Systems of Government

12. Democracies, dictatorships and monarchies are categories for understanding the relationship between those in power or authority and citizens.

12

1 – 3*

Economics

Economic Decision Making and Skills

13. Information displayed in circle graphs can be used to show relative proportions of segments of data to an entire body of data.

13

1 – 2*

10
33.3%

14. The choices made by individuals and governments have both present and future consequences.

14

1 – 2*

Scarcity

15. The availability of productive resources (i.e.,entrepreneurship, human resources, capital goods and natural resources) promotes specialization that could lead to trade.

15

1 – 2*

Production and Consumption

16. The availability of productive resources and the division of labor can have a positive or negative impact productive capacity.

16

1 – 2*

Markets

17. Regions and countries become interdependent when they specialize
in what they produce best and then trade with other regions to increase the amount and variety of goods and services available.

17

1 – 2*

Financial Literacy

18. Workers can improve their ability to earn income by gaining new knowledge, skills and experiences.

18

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 5 – 10 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
2 10 – 20 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 1 – 4 points (~ 10%)
3 5 – 10 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 3 – 5 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 4 – 7 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 4 – 7 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 12 – 18 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 3 – 5 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 12 – 18 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 1 – 4 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
Pro-Core Grade 6 Social Studies Blueprint (30 Total Points – 6 Anchors)

Strand

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Strand

History

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. Multiple tier timelines can be used to show relationships among events and places.

1

2

4
13.3%
26.7% with Government

(26–30% on State Blueprint)

Early Civilizations

2. Early civilizations (India, Egypt, China and Mesopotamia) had unique governments, economic systems, social structures, religions, technologies and agricultural practices and products. The cultural practices and products of these early civilizations can be used to help understand the Eastern Hemisphere today.

2

2

Geography

Spatial Thinking and Skills

3. Geographic tools can be used to gather, process and report information about people, places and environments. Cartographers decide which information to include and how it is displayed.

3

2

12
37.5%

(35–40% on State Blueprint)

4. Latitude and longitude can be used to identify absolute location.

4

2

Places and Regions

5. Regions can be determined, classified and compared using various criteria (e.g., landform, climate, population, cultural, or economic).

5

2

Human Systems

6. The variety of physical environments within the Eastern Hemisphere influences human activities. Likewise, human activities also alter the physical environment.

6

2

7. Political, environmental, social and economic factors cause people, products and ideas to move from place to place in the Eastern Hemisphere in the past and today.

7

2

8. Diffusion of agricultural practices and products, technology, cultural practices and major world religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism) impacted the Eastern Hemisphere.

8

2

Government

Civic Participation and Skills

9. Different perspectives on a topic can be obtained from a variety of historic and contemporary sources and used to effectively communicate and defend a claim based on evidence. Sources should be examined for accuracy and credibility.

9

2

4
15.6%
28.1% with History

(26–30% on State Blueprint)

Roles and Systems of Government

10. Governments can be categorized as monarchies, theocracies, dictatorships or democracies, but categories may overlap and labels may not accurately represent how governments function. The extent of citizens’ liberties and responsibilities varies according to limits on governmental authority.

10

2

Economics

Economic Decision Making and Skills

11. Economists compare data sets to draw conclusions about relationships among them.

11

1 – 2*

10
34.3%

(32–37% on State Blueprint)

12. The choices made by individuals and governments have both present and future consequences. The evaluation of choices is relative and may differ across individuals and societies.

12

1 – 2*

Scarcity

13. The fundamental questions of economics include what to produce, how to produce and for whom to produce.

13

1 – 2*

14. When regions and/or countries specialize, global trade occurs.

14

1 – 2*

Markets

15. The interaction of supply and demand, influenced by competition, helps to determine price in a market. This interaction also determines the quantities of outputs produced and the quantities productive resources (entrepreneurship, human resources, natural resources and capital) used.

15

1 – 2*

Financial Literacy

16. When selecting items to buy, individuals can weigh costs and benefits and compare the price and quality of available goods and services.

16

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 5 – 10 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
2 10 – 20 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 1 – 4 points (~ 10%)
3 5 – 10 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 3 – 5 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 4 – 7 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 4 – 7 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 12 – 18 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 3 – 5 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 12 – 18 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 1 – 4 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
Pro-Core Grade 7 Social Studies Blueprint (32 Total Points – 7 Anchors)

Strand

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Strand

History

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. Historians and archaeologists describe historical events and issues from the perspectives of people living at the time to avoid evaluating the past in terms of today’s norms and values.

1

1 – 2*

16
50.0%

Early Civilizations

2. The civilizations that developed in Greece and Rome had an enduring impact on later civilizations. This legacy includes governance and law, engineering and technology, art and architecture, as well as literature and history. The Roman Empire also played an instrumental role in the spread of Christianity.

2

1 – 2*

Feudalism and Transitions

3. The Roman Empire collapsed due to various internal and external factors (political, social and economic) which led to the development of feudalism and the manorial system in the region. The fall of Rome and later invasions also allowed for the creation of new Empires in the region..

3

1 – 2*

4. The Mongols conquered much of Asia which led to unified states in China and Korea. Mongol failure to conquer Japan allowed a feudal system to persist.

4

1 – 2*

5. Achievements in medicine, science, mathematics and geography by the Islamic civilization dominated most of the Mediterranean after the decline of the Roman Empire. These achievements were introduced into Western Europe as a result of the Muslim conquests, Crusades and trade, influencing the European Renaissance.

5

1 – 2*

6. The decline of feudalism, the rise of nation-states and the Renaissance in Europe introduced revolutionary ideas, leading to cultural, scientific and social changes.

6

1 – 2*

7. The Reformation introduced changes in religion including the emergence of Protestant faiths and a decline in the political power and social influence of the Roman Catholic Church.

7

1 – 2*

First Global Age

8. Empires in Africa grew as commercial and cultural centers along trade routes.

8

1 – 2*

9. The advent of the trans- Saharan slave trade had profound effects on both West and Central Africa and the receiving societies.

9

1 – 2*

10. European economic and cultural influence dramatically increased through explorations, conquests and colonization.

10

1 – 2*

11. The Columbian Exchange (e.g., the exchange of fauna, flora and pathogens) among previously unconnected parts of the world reshaped societies in ways still evident today.

11

1 – 2*

Geography

Spatial Thinking and Skills

12. Maps and other geographic representations can be used to trace the development of human settlement over time.

12

1 – 2*

6
18.8%

Human Systems

13. Geographic factors promote or impede the movement of people, products and ideas.

13

1 – 2*

14. Trade routes connecting Africa, Europe and Asia helped foster the spread of ideas, technology, goods and major world religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism) impacted the Eastern Hemisphere.

14

1 – 2*

15. Improvements in transportation, communication and technology have facilitated cultural diffusion among peoples around the world.

15

1 – 2*

Government

Civic Participation and Skills

16. Analyzing individual and group perspectives is essential to understanding historic and contemporary issues. Opportunities for civic engagement exist for students to connect real world issues and events to classroom learning

16

1 – 2*

5
15.6%

Roles and Systems of Government

17. Greek democracy and the Roman Republic were radical departures from monarchy and theocracy, influencing the structure and function of modern democratic governments.

17

1 – 2*

18. With the decline of feudalism, consolidation of power resulted in the emergence of nation states.

18

1 – 2*

Economics

Economic Decision Making and Skills

19. Individuals, governments and businesses must analyze costs and benefits when making economic decisions. A cost- benefit analysis consists of determining the potential costs and benefits of an action and then balancing the costs against the benefits.

19

1 – 2*

5
15.6%

Scarcity

20. The variability in the distribution of productive resources in the various regions of the world contributed to specialization, trade and interdependence.

20

1 – 2*

Markets

21. The growth of cities and empires fostered the growth of markets. Market exchanges encouraged specialization and the transition from barter to monetary economies.

21

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 5 – 11 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
2 11 – 21 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
3 5 – 11 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 3 – 6 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 5 – 8 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 5 – 8 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 13 – 19 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 3 – 6 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 13 – 19 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
Pro-Core Grade 8 Social Studies Blueprint (38 Total Points – 8 Anchors)

Strand

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Strand

History

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. Primary and secondary sources are used to examine events from multiple perspectives and to present and defend a position.

1

1 – 2*

20
47.3%

Colonization to Independence

2. North America, originally inhabited by American Indians, was explored and colonized by Europeans for economic and religious reasons.

2

1 – 2*

3. Competition for control of territory and resources in North America led to conflicts among colonizing powers.

3

1 – 2*

4. The practice of race-based slavery led to the forced migration of Africans to the American colonies and contributed to colonial economic development. Their knowledge, skills and traditions were essential to the development of the colonies.

4

1 – 2*

5. The ideas of the Enlightenment and dissatisfaction with colonial rule led English colonists to write the Declaration of Independence and launch the American Revolution.

5

1 – 2*

A New Nation

6. Key events and significant figures in American history influenced the course and outcome of the American Revolution.

6

1 – 2*

7. The outcome of the American Revolution was national independence and new political, social and economic relationships for the American people.

7

1 – 2*

8. Problems arising under the Articles of Confederation led to debate over the adoption of the U.S. Constitution.

8

1 – 2*

9. Actions of early presidential administrations established a strong federal government, provided peaceful transitions of power and repelled a foreign invasion.

9

1 – 2*

Expansion

10. The United States added to its territory through treaties and purchases.

10

1 – 2*

11. Westward expansion contributed to economic and industrial development, debates over sectional issues, war with Mexico and the displacement of American Indians.

11

1 – 2*

Civil War and Reconstruction

12. Disputes over the nature of federalism, complicated by economic developments in the United States, resulted in sectional issues, including slavery, which led to the American Civil War.

12

1 – 2*

13. Key events and significant figures in American history influenced the course and outcome of the Civil War.

13

1 – 2*

14. The Reconstruction period resulted in changes to the U.S. Constitution, an affirmation of federal authority and lingering social and political differences.

14

1 – 2*

Geography

Spatial Thinking and Skills

15. Modern and historical maps and other geographic tools are used to analyze how historic events are shaped by geography.

15

1 – 2*

7
21.1%

Human Systems

16. The availability of natural resources contributed to the geographic and economic expansion of the United States, sometimes resulting in unintended environmental consequences.

16

1 – 2*

17. The movement of people, products and ideas resulted in new patterns of settlement and land use that influenced the political and economic development of the United States.

17

1 – 2*

18. Cultural biases, stereotypes and prejudices had social, political and economic consequences for minority groups and the population as a whole.

18

1 – 2*

19. Americans began to develop a unique national identity among diverse regional and cultural populations based on democratic ideals.

19

1 – 2*

Government

Civic Participation and Skills

20. Active participation in social and civic groups can lead to the attainment of individual and public goals.

20

1 – 2*

6
15.8%

21. Informed citizens understand how media and communication technology influence public opinion.

21

1 – 2*

Roles and Systems of Government

22. The U.S. Constitution established a federal republic, providing a framework for a national government with elected representatives, separation of powers and checks and balances.

22

1 – 2*

23. The U.S. Constitution protects citizens’ rights by limiting the powers of government.

23

1 – 2*

Economics

Economic Decision Making and Skills

24. Choices made by individuals, businesses and governments have both present and future consequences.

24

1 – 2*

5
15.8%

Production and Consumption

25. The Industrial Revolution fundamentally changed the means of production as a result of improvements in technology, use of new power resources, the advent of interchangeable parts and the shift from craftwork to factory work.

25

1 – 2*

Markets

26. Governments can impact markets by means of spending, regulations, taxes and trade barriers.

26

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 6 – 13 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
2 13 – 25 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 6 points (~ 10%)
3 6 – 13 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 4 – 8 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 6 – 10 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 6 – 10 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 15 – 23 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 4 – 8 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 15 – 23 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 6 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
Modern World History Blueprint (37 Total Points – 8 Anchors)

Category

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Category

Skills

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. The use of primary and secondary sources of information includes an examination of the credibility of each source.

2. Historians develop theses and use evidence to support or refute positions.

3. Historians analyze cause, effect, sequence, and correlation in historical events, including multiple causation and long- and short-term causal relations.

1

1 – 2*

4
11%

1600 – 1945

Age of Enlightenment (1600 – 1800)

4. The Scientific Revolution impacted religious, political, and cultural institutions by challenging how people viewed the world.

2

1 – 2*

17
46%

5. Enlightenment ideas regarding human nature and society challenged religious authority, absolute rule and mercantilism.

3

1 – 2*

6. Enlightenment ideas on the relationship of the individual and the government influenced the American and French Revolutions.

4

1 – 2*

Age of Revolutions (1750 – 1914)

7. The American and French Revolutions influenced Latin American revolutions for independence.

5

1 – 2*

8. Industrialization had social, political and economic effects on Western Europe and the world.

6

1 – 2*

Imperialism (1800 – 1914)

9. Imperial expansion had political, economic and social roots.

7

1 – 2*

10. Imperialism involved land acquisition, extraction of raw materials, spread of Western values and direct political control.

8

1 – 2*

11. The consequences of imperialism were viewed differently by the colonizers and the colonized.

9

1 – 2*

Achievements and Crises (1900 – 1945)

12. Advances in technology, communication and transportation improved lives, but also had negative consequences.

10

1 – 2*

13. The causes of World War I included militarism, imperialism, nationalism and alliances.

11

1 – 2*

14. The consequences of World War I and the worldwide depression set the stage for the Russian Revolution, the rise of totalitarianism, aggressive Axis expansion and the policy of appeasement which in turn led to World War II.

12

1 – 2*

15. Oppression and discrimination resulted in the Armenian Genocide during World War I and the Holocaust, the state-sponsored mass murder of Jews and other groups, during World War II.

13

1 – 2*

16. World War II devastated most of Europe and Asia, led to the occupation of Eastern Europe and Japan, and began the atomic age.

14

1 – 2*

1945 – present

The Cold War (1945 – 1991)

17. The United States and the Soviet Union became superpowers and competed for global influence.

15

1 – 2*

16
43%

18. Treaties and agreements at the end of World War II changed national boundaries and created multinational organizations.

16

1 – 2*

19. Religious diversity, the end of colonial rule and rising nationalism have led to regional conflicts in the Middle East.

17

1 – 2*

20. Postwar global politics led to the rise of nationalist movements in Africa and Southeast Asia.

18

1 – 2*

21. Political and social struggles have resulted in expanded rights and freedoms for women and indigenous peoples.

19

1 – 2*

Globalization (1991 – Present)

22. The break-up of the Soviet Union ended the Cold War and created challenges for its former allies, the former Soviet republics, Europe, the United States and the non- aligned world.

20

1 – 2*

23. Regional and ethnic conflicts in the post-Cold War era have resulted in acts of terrorism, genocide and ethnic cleansing.

21

1 – 2*

24. Political and cultural groups have struggled to achieve self-governance and self- determination.

22

1 – 2*

25. Emerging economic powers and improvements in technology have created a more interdependent global economy.

23

1 – 2*

26. Proliferation of nuclear weapons has created a challenge to world peace.

24

1 – 2*

27. The rapid increase of global population, coupled with an increase in life expectancy and mass migrations have created societal and governmental challenges.

25

1 – 2*

28. Environmental concerns, impacted by population growth and heightened by international competition for the world’s energy supplies, have resulted in a new environmental consciousness and a movement for the sustainability of the world’s resources.

26

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 6 – 12 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
2 12 – 25 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 6 points (~ 10%)
3 6 – 12 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 4 – 7 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 6 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 6 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 15 – 22 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 4 – 7 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 15 – 22 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 6 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
American History Blueprint (32 Total Points – 7 Anchors)

Category

Strand

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Category

Skills and Documents

Historical Thinking and Skills

1. The use of primary and secondary sources of information includes an examination of the credibility of each source.

2. Historians develop theses and use evidence to support or refute positions.

3. Historians analyze cause, effect, sequence and correlation in historical events, including multiple causation and long- and short-term causal relations.

1

1 – 2*

8
28%

(26–30% on State Blueprint)

Founding Documents

4. The Declaration of Independence elaborates on the rights and role of the people in building the foundations of the American nation through the principles of unalienable rights and consent of the people.

2

1 – 2*

5. The Northwest Ordinance elaborates on the rights and role of the people in building the foundations of the American nation through its establishment of natural rights and setting up educational institutions.

3

1 – 2*

6. The U.S. Constitution established the foundations of the American nation and the relationship between the people and their government.

4

1 – 2*

7. The debate presented by the Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers over protections for individuals and limits on government power resulted in the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights provides constitutional protections for individual liberties and limits on governmental power.

5

1 – 2*

1877 – 1945

Industrialization and Progressivism (1877 – 1920)

8. The rise of corporations, heavy industry, mechanized farming and technological innovations transformed the American economy from an agrarian to an increasingly urban industrial society.

9. The rise of industrialization led to a rapidly expanding workforce. Labor organizations grew amidst unregulated working conditions, laissez-faire policies toward big business, and violence toward supporters of organized labor.

6

1 – 2*

13
41%

(37–41% on State Blueprint)

10. Immigration, internal migration and urbanization transformed American life.

11. Continued settlement by Americans in the West intensified conflict with American Indians and reinforced the policy of the reservation system.

7

1 – 2*

12. Following Reconstruction, old political and social structures reemerged and racial discrimination was institutionalized.

8

1 – 2*

13. The Progressive era was an effort to address the ills of American society stemming from industrial capitalism, urbanization and political corruption.

9

1 – 2*

Foreign Affairs from Imperialism to Post-World War I (1898 – 1930)

14. As a result of overseas expansion, the Spanish-American War and World War I, the United States emerged as a world power.

10

1 – 2*

15. After WWI, the United States pursued efforts to maintain peace in the world. However, as a result of the national debate over the Versailles Treaty ratification and the League of Nations, the United States moved away from the role of world peacekeeper and limited its involvement in international affairs.

11

1 – 2*

Prosperity, Depression and the New Deal (1919 – 1941)

16. Racial intolerance, anti-immigrant attitudes and the Red Scare contributed to social unrest after World War I.

12

1 – 2*

17. An improved standard of living for many, combined with technological innovations in communication, transportation and industry, resulted in social and cultural changes and tensions.

13

1 – 2*

18. Movements such as the Harlem Renaissance, African-American migration, women’s suffrage and Prohibition all contributed to social change.

14

1 – 2*

19. The Great Depression was caused, in part, by the federal government’s monetary policies, stock market speculation, and increasing consumer debt. The role of the federal government expanded as a result of the Great Depression.

15

1 – 2*

From Isolation to World War (1930 – 1945)

20. During the 1930s, the U.S. government attempted to distance the country from earlier interventionist policies in the Western Hemisphere as well as retain an isolationist approach to events in Europe and Asia until the beginning of WWII.

16

1 – 2*

21. United States policy and mobilization of its economic and military resources during World War II affected American society. Despite mistreatment, marginalized groups played important roles in the war effort while continuing to protest unfair treatment.

17

1 – 2*

1945 – Present

The Cold War (1945 – 1991)

22. Use of atomic weapons changed the nature of war, altered the balance of power and began the nuclear age.

18

1 – 2*

11
34%

(3–35% on State Blueprint)

23. The United States followed a policy of containment during the Cold War in response to the spread of communism.

24. The Second Red Scare and McCarthyism reflected Cold War fears in American society.

19

1 – 2*

25. The Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced domestic and international politics.

20

1 – 2*

26. The collapse of communist governments in Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R brought an end to the Cold War.

21

1 – 2*

Social Transformations in the United States (1945 – 1991)

27. Following World War II, the United States experienced a struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil rights.

22

1 – 2*

28. The postwar economic boom, and advances in science and technology, produced changes in American life.

29. The continuing population flow from cities to suburbs, the internal migrations from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt, and the increase in immigration resulting from passage of the 1965 Immigration Act have had social and political effects.

23

1 – 2*

30. Political debates focused on the extent of the role of government in the economy, environmental protection, social welfare and national security.

24

1 – 2*

United States and Post-Cold War (1991 – present)

31. Improved global communications, international trade, transnational business organizations, overseas competition and the shift from manufacturing to service industries have impacted the American economy.

25

1 – 2*

32. Focusing on domestic policy, the United States faces ongoing social, political, national security and economic challenges in the post-Cold War era and following the attacks on September 11, 2001.

33. Focusing on foreign policy, the United States faces ongoing social, political, national security and economic challenges in the post-Cold War era and following the attacks on September 11, 2001.

26

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 6 – 12 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
2 12 – 25 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 6 points (~ 10%)
3 6 – 12 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 4 – 7 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 6 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 6 – 9 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 15 – 22 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 4 – 7 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 15 – 22 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 6 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 4 points (~ 5%)
American Government Blueprint (32 Total Points – 7 Anchors)

Category

Topic

Ohio Standard

Pro-Core Code

Number of Points

Standard

Category

Founding Documents
*at least 20% of the test

Basic Principles of the U.S. Constitution

6. The Federalist Papers and the Anti-Federalist Papers framed the national debate over the basic principles of government encompassed by the Constitution of the United States and led to the adoption of the Bill of Rights.

4

1 – 2*

11
34.3%

(31–36% in State Blueprint)

8. The Bill of Rights was drafted to ensure the protection of civil liberties of the people and place limits on the federal government.

6

1 – 2*

9. The constitutional amendments known collectively as the Reconstruction Amendments extended new constitutional protections to African Americans, though the struggle to fully achieve equality would continue

7

1 – 2*

10. Constitutional amendments have provided for civil rights such as suffrage for disenfranchised groups.

8

1 – 2*

11. Constitutional amendments have altered provisions for the structure and functions of the federal government.

9

1 – 2*

Ohio’s State and Local Governments

16. As a framework for the state, the Ohio has similarities and differences to the federal Constitution; it was changed in 1851 to address difficulties governing the state.

14

1 – 3*

Principles and Structure

Civic Participation and Skills

3. Issues can be analyzed through the critical use of credible sources.

1

1 – 2*

13
40.6%

(38–43% in State Blueprint)

4. The processes of persuasion, compromise, consensus building and negotiation contribute to the democratic process.

2

1 – 2*

Basic Principles of the U.S. Constitution

5. As the supreme law of the land, the U.S. Constitution incorporates basic principles which help define the government of the United States as a federal republic including its structure, powers and relationship with the governed.

3

1 – 2*

7. Constitutional government in the United States has changed over time as a result of amendments to the U.S. Constitution, Supreme Court decisions, legislation and informal practices.

5

1 – 2*

Structure and Functions of the Federal Government

12. Law and public policy are created and implemented by three branches of government; each functions with its own set of powers and responsibilities.

10

1 – 2*

13. The political process creates a dynamic interaction among the three branches of government in addressing current issues.

11

1 – 2*

Role of the People

14. In the United States, people have rights which protect them from undue governmental interference. Rights carry responsibilities which help define how people use their rights and which require respect for the rights of others.

12

1 – 2*

15. Historically, the United States has struggled with majority rule and the extension of minority rights. As a result of this struggle, the government has increasingly extended civil rights to marginalized groups and broadened opportunities for participation.

13

1 – 2*

Ohio, Policy, and Economy

Ohio’s State and Local Governments

17. Individuals in Ohio have a responsibility to assist state and local governments as they address relevant and often controversial problems that directly affect their communities.

15

1 – 2*

8
25%

(23–28% in State Blueprint)

Public Policy

18. A variety of entities within the three branches of government, at all levels, address public policy issues which arise in domestic and international affairs.

16

1 – 2*

19. Individuals and organizations play a role within federal, state and local governments in helping to determine public (domestic and foreign) policy.

17

1 – 2*

Government and the Economy

20. The federal government uses spending and tax policy to maintain economic stability and foster economic growth. Regulatory actions carry economic costs and benefits.

18

1 – 2*

21. The Federal Reserve System uses monetary tools to regulate the nation’s money supply and moderate the effects of expansion and contraction in the economy.

19

1 – 2*

*Ranges leave flexibility for 2-point questions. The total number of points for the Strand should equal the number indicated.

DoK Goals for each test Goals for each p-value range
1 5 – 11 points (16–33%) 0.10 – 0.19 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)
2 11 – 21 points (33–67%) 0.20 – 0.29 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
3 5 – 11 points (16–33%) 0.30 – 0.39 3 – 6 points (~ 15%)
0.40 – 0.49 5 – 8 points (~ 20%)
Question Type Goals for each test 0.50 – 0.59 5 – 8 points (~ 20%)
Multiple Choice: 13 – 19 (40 – 60%) 0.60 – 0.69 3 – 6 points (~ 15%)
Technology Enhanced: 13 – 19 (40 – 60%) 0.70 – 0.79 2 – 5 points (~ 10%)
0.80 – 0.89 1 – 3 points (~ 5%)